[A2k] Brazilian Ministry of Culture removes Creative Commons licenses from its website

Heather Ford hfordsa at gmail.com
Mon Jan 24 19:54:08 PST 2011


On 2011/01/24 10:11 AM, Carolina Rossini wrote:
> The works developed by the Brazilian gov are not in public domain (as 
> happens in USA), so  to clarify the status is important.
>
> It was a real victory when they adopted CC, since before that was "all 
> rights reserved". The lack of CC or a clear license creates  lots of 
> legal confusion...plus leave the users in a gray area in regard to the 
> material that was under the license before (since they did not explain 
> any transition issues, or separated what was affected by the license 
> in effect since 2003, and what happens now 2011 forward).
>
> So, I have to completely disagree with you Heather (as would anybody 
> from the Brazilian civil society groups engaged in a clear A2K policy 
> in Brazil)
Do you mean that everybody disagrees with me? Or that everyone who cares 
about A2K should?

And that begs the question: can there be access to knowledge (that's 
what A2K stands for, right?) without CC? Sounds like you're saying that 
"anybody who works in A2K in Brazil" would believe that such a thing is 
impossible.

And that would be a pretty significant statement.
>
> C .
>
>
>
> On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 9:41 AM, Heather Ford <hfordsa at gmail.com 
> <mailto:hfordsa at gmail.com>> wrote:
>
>     This is interesting - thanks for sending, Carolina.
>
>     I'm not quite sure why this is necessarily bad, though. The
>     government hasn't replaced the logo with an all rights reserved
>     notice. There still seems to be an intention for flexibility.
>
>     Also, I would have thought that taking the CC license off of
>     government materials would be a good thing (since surely it should
>     be in the public domain?)
>
>     Perhaps there's something I'm not getting from this?
>
>     Best,
>     Heather.
>
>     On 2011/01/24 9:02 AM, Carolina Rossini wrote:
>
>         *Brazilian Ministry of Culture removes Creative Commons
>         licenses from its
>
>         website*
>
>
>
>         Since 2003, the Brazilian Ministry of Culture website’s
>         content has been
>         posted under a Creative Commons license, but the new Ministry
>         has removed
>         the Creative Commons logo from its website.  The removal
>         occurred shortly
>         after the publication of an open letter asking for the
>         continuation of
>         copyright reforms that were adopted or were under discussion
>         during the
>         government of Lula, and which would have expanded limitations
>         and exceptions
>         to copyright.  Therefore, the removal has been interpreted by
>         the Brazilian
>         civil society as a sign of the inflexibility of Minister Ana
>         de Hollanda,
>         who opposes the reforms. Click here for
>         more.<http://infojustice.org/archives/867>
>
>         * *
>
>
>
>     -- 
>     --
>     Heather Ford
>     UC Berkeley School of Information
>     http://hblog.org | https://twitter.com/hfordsa
>
>
>
>
> -- 
> *Carolina Rossini*
> Coordinator: OER-Brazil
> www.rea.net.br <http://www.rea.net.br>
> + 1 6176979389
> *carolina.rossini at gmail.com <mailto:carolina.rossini at gmail.com>*
>


-- 
--
Heather Ford
UC Berkeley School of Information
http://hblog.org | https://twitter.com/hfordsa




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