[A2k] Brazilian Ministry of Culture removes Creative Commons licenses from its website

Carolina Rossini carolina.rossini at gmail.com
Mon Jan 24 21:57:05 PST 2011


Given that we must conduct these discussions in English, which is as you
know not my native language, I will sometimes phrase things a bit
wrong. Typically on international lists that is taken into account.

Obviously it is not everybody, but it is a lot of us, and this is not a
great moment for us in Brazil. The people who are agreeing with your point
the loudest in Brazil are unfortunately the pro-copyright collecting
societies :-(

As I said, the works are not in the public domain in Brazil, different from
the US. Plus our Br are exceptions and limitations are not broad enough.
Thus open license come to fill that need. Of course, there is a coalition of
civil society and academics from all over Brazil - that I am part of -
making the argument that our limitations and exceptions should be broadened
... but we do not know any more if the reform of our copyright law will go
through or not under the new Ministry of Culture (who is very close to
people and institutions against many of the A2K principles we all believe in
- as Marilia also pointed out here). Thus, CC still plays an important role
there.

C



On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 7:54 PM, Heather Ford <hfordsa at gmail.com> wrote:

>  On 2011/01/24 10:11 AM, Carolina Rossini wrote:
>
>
>  So, I have to completely disagree with you Heather (as would anybody from
> the Brazilian civil society groups engaged in a clear A2K policy in Brazil)
>
> Do you mean that everybody disagrees with me? Or that everyone who cares
> about A2K should?
>
> And that begs the question: can there be access to knowledge (that's what
> A2K stands for, right?) without CC? Sounds like you're saying that "anybody
> who works in A2K in Brazil" would believe that such a thing is impossible.
>
> And that would be a pretty significant statement.
>
>
>  C .
>
>
>
> On Mon, Jan 24, 2011 at 9:41 AM, Heather Ford <hfordsa at gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> This is interesting - thanks for sending, Carolina.
>>
>> I'm not quite sure why this is necessarily bad, though. The government
>> hasn't replaced the logo with an all rights reserved notice. There still
>> seems to be an intention for flexibility.
>>
>> Also, I would have thought that taking the CC license off of government
>> materials would be a good thing (since surely it should be in the public
>> domain?)
>>
>> Perhaps there's something I'm not getting from this?
>>
>> Best,
>> Heather.
>>
>> On 2011/01/24 9:02 AM, Carolina Rossini wrote:
>>
>>> *Brazilian Ministry of Culture removes Creative Commons licenses from its
>>>
>>>
>>> website*
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Since 2003, the Brazilian Ministry of Culture website’s content has been
>>> posted under a Creative Commons license, but the new Ministry has removed
>>> the Creative Commons logo from its website.  The removal occurred shortly
>>> after the publication of an open letter asking for the continuation of
>>> copyright reforms that were adopted or were under discussion during the
>>> government of Lula, and which would have expanded limitations and
>>> exceptions
>>> to copyright.  Therefore, the removal has been interpreted by the
>>> Brazilian
>>> civil society as a sign of the inflexibility of Minister Ana de Hollanda,
>>> who opposes the reforms. Click here for
>>>  more.<http://infojustice.org/archives/867>
>>>
>>> * *
>>>
>>>
>>
>> --
>>  --
>> Heather Ford
>> UC Berkeley School of Information
>> http://hblog.org | https://twitter.com/hfordsa
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> *Carolina Rossini*
> Coordinator: OER-Brazil
> www.rea.net.br
> + 1 6176979389
> *carolina.rossini at gmail.com*
>
>
>
> --
> --
> Heather Ford
> UC Berkeley School of Informationhttp://hblog.org | https://twitter.com/hfordsa
>
>


-- 
*Carolina Rossini*
Coordinator: OER-Brazil
www.rea.net.br
+ 1 6176979389
*carolina.rossini at gmail.com*



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