[A2k] Infojustuce Roundup - April 29, 2013

Michael Palmedo mpalmedo at wcl.american.edu
Mon Apr 29 08:48:15 PDT 2013


Infojustice Roundup

Global Academics' Expert Letter on LDC Extension

 

[Brook Baker] Over 130 academics from around the world have signed a letter supporting the unconditional extension of the transition period within which least development country Members of the WTO must become fully compliant with the TRIPS Agreement until any such country ceases to be a least developed country. The letter articulates 10 reasons supporting the proposed extension, many drawn directly from the language of Article 66.1 itself. Click here for more. <http://infojustice.org/archives/29438> 

 

Nueva Ronda TPP: ¿necesita Chile firmar este acuerdo?

 

[Francisco Vera] Como publicamos a inicios de marzo, ONG Derechos Digitales estuvo presente (junto con otras organizaciones como la UNA) en la última ronda de negociaciones del acuerdo TPP, llevada a cabo en la islaciudad-Etado de Singapur. En la ocasión, pudimos reafirmar la idea de que este acuerdo económico tiene altos costos y ganancias muy marginales, tesis que, de hecho, pudimos compartir unos días después en Chile. Click here for more. <http://www.derechosdigitales.org/3776/tpp-singapur/> 

 

Campaign for a Progressive Copyright Law in the Ukraine

 

[EIFL]  On the occasion of World Intellectual Property Day with the theme "Creativity: the next generation", EIFL is pleased to publish the fourth in a series of case studies with the results of advocacy campaigns in support of copyright law reform in EIFL partner countries... Significant resources are being invested in improving library services in Uzbekistan, but legal and knowledge barriers stand in the way of developing an effective information society. In the case study, read how librarians in Uzbekistan are campaigning for a progressive copyright law in support of library development. Click here for more. <http://infojustice.org/archives/29403> 

 

Rep. Goodlatte Announces "Comprehensive" Review of U.S. Copyright Law

 

[Mike Palmedo] Today House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte announced an upcoming review of U.S. copyright law:   "the House Judiciary Committee will hold a comprehensive series of hearings on U.S. copyright law in the months ahead. The goal of these hearings will be to determine whether the laws are still working in the digital age. I welcome all interested parties to submit their views and concerns to the Committee. I welcome all interested parties to submit their views and concerns to the Committee." Click here for more. <http://infojustice.org/archives/29395> 

 

Human Rights and Access to Medicines Cases   

 

[Sean Flynn] This Friday I attended a workshop at Yale Law School Global Health Justice Partnership to discuss the end product of a clinical project exploring human rights strategies to promote access to medicine... it contains a lot of great information, especially on some relatively recent cases that have used the right to heath to interpret or trump various maximalist versions of intellectual property laws affecting access to pharmaceuticals. Here is a quick overview of some of those key cases. Click here for more. <http://infojustice.org/archives/29409> 

 

Op-ed on Publisher Lawsuit Against Delhi University: Why Students Need the Right to Copy

 

[Shamnad Basheer]  Late last year, leading publishing houses including Oxford University Press and Cambridge University Press brought a copyright action against Delhi University and a tiny photocopy shop licensed by it, seeking to restrain them from supplying educational course packs to students. This lawsuit sent shock waves across the academic community, leading more than 300 authors and academics including famed Nobel laureate Professor Amartya Sen to protest this copyright aggression in an open letter to publishers. Tellingly, 33 of the authors of various books mentioned specifically in the lawsuit (as having been copied in the course packs) signed this protest letter making it clear that they were dissociating themselves from this unfortunate lawsuit. Click here for more. <http://infojustice.org/archives/29421> 

 

EP trade committee rejects meaningful TTIP amendments

 

[Ante Wessells] Today the European Parliament International Trade committee voted on a draft resolution on the EU - US trade agreement (TTIP / TAFTA). La Quadrature du Net summarizes it: EU Parliament Opens The Door to Copyright Repression in TAFTA. The INTA committee could have voted meaningful amendments into the draft resolution, but declined to do that. Click here for more. <http://infojustice.org/archives/29430> 

 

Investors' IP Rights Unbound: The Danger of Investment Clauses to Access to Medicines

 

[Brook Baker] Although access to medicines activists have been wise to focus our attention intently on convincing low- and middle-income countries to adopt and use all possible TRIPS-compliant flexibilities and to oppose the TRIPS-plus IP chapters in free trade agreements, we have neglected to interrogate another chapter in free trade agreements and bilateral investment treaties that perhaps pose an even greater threat to our collective access to medicines - investment chapters. Click here for more. <http://infojustice.org/archives/29388> 

 

Revisiting USTR's Negotiating Objectives in New Trade Promotion Authority Legislation

 

[Mike Palmedo] Pressure on Capitol Hill for Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) is growing. TPA - called "fasttrack" in the 1990s when it was used to negotiate NAFTA - allows the executive branch to negotiate trade agreements that Congress cannot amend during the ratification process.  It also sets procedural rules under which trade agreements are negotiated, and the objectives of the United States for the outcomes of trade negotiations. Click here for more. <http://infojustice.org/archives/29413> 

 

Korean Copyright Reform Bill, and Opposition from the Copyright Industries

 

[Heesob Nam] As you may well know the three-strikes-out rule was first enacted in S. Korea in 2009. Also this country introduced in 2006 a filtering obligation upon P2P and cyberlocker service providers. In January, Mr. Choi introduced a bill to entirely remove those notorious rules from the Korean Copyright Act. This provoked strong oppositions from the copyright industries, not only from domestic ones but also from international ones such IFPI and Universal Music Group International. Click here for more. <http://infojustice.org/archives/29378> 

 

 

 




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