[A2k] Why a WIPO Treaty for Persons with Print Disabilities can change lives - Mongolia

Teresa Hackett teresa.hackett at eifl.net
Mon Jun 24 02:55:51 PDT 2013


http://www.eifl.net/why-wipo-vip-treaty-can-change-lives-mongolia

Why a WIPO Treaty for Persons with Print Disabilities can change lives

DAISY readers in Mongolia a legal right - now copyright law must play its part

EIFL supports the conclusion of an effective treaty for the benefit of
print disabled people at the Diplomatic Conference in Marrakesh, 17-28
June 2013. By ‘effective’ we mean an international copyright framework
that will make a real difference to the lives of blind, visually
impaired and print disabled people around the world.

Most of Mongolia’s 15,000 blind and low vision people are unemployed.
Their access to learning and information is extremely limited, and
many live in poverty. Since 2010, Ulaanbaatar Public Library (UPL) and
the Mongolian National Federation of the Blind (MNFB) built two
recording studios to create talking books in digital DAISY format that
has increased the amount of accessible materials, and opened up new
worlds of learning for visually impaired people.

Following the success of the DAISY Talking Books service, the Social
Welfare law was amended in 2012 so that all blind and visually
impaired people in Mongolia now have the legal right to be issued with
a free DAISY talking book player. “This represents a huge opportunity
for blind and visually impaired people to have equal access to the
information and knowledge which they so desperately need to improve
their lives”, said Mr M. Tsengel, DAISY Expert at Ulaanbaatar Public
Library (UPL).

Now copyright law must play its part. “An extensive challenge is
digitizing textbooks for blind children. Publishers, who own all the
rights, do not permit the DAISY Center and the Mongolian National
Federation of the Blind to convert the textbooks. So blind children
learning at school have no modern books, and rely instead on ancient
Braille textbooks printed in Russia during the socialist period. We
must fix this situation urgently”, said Mr Tsengel. “We need to be
allowed to access DAISY content from organizations in other countries.
We have raised the hopes of blind people in Mongolia to read books,
copyright law can’t let them down”.

Supported by the Mongolian Libraries Consortium

Read more at EIFL in action

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Teresa Hackett
EIFL-IP Programme Manager
www.eifl.net/copyright
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