[A2k] WIPO General Assembly 2014: KEI statement on the Report of the Committee on Development and Intellectual Property (CDIP)

Thiru Balasubramaniam thiru at keionline.org
Wed Sep 24 08:20:25 PDT 2014


http://keionline.org/node/2093

On Wednesday, 24 September 2014, Knowledge Ecology International delivered
the following statement at the 2014 WIPO General Assembly on agenda item
13, Report of the Committee on Development and Intellectual Property (CDIP)
and Review of the Implementation of the Development Agenda Recommendations.

13. Report of the Committee on Development and Intellectual Property (CDIP)
and Review of the Implementation of the Development Agenda Recommendations

Statement of Knowledge Ecology International

The WIPO CDIP has a very important mission, to ensure there is continued
support for the development dimension in WIPO’s work. In practical terms,
this is some combination of helping member states implement appropriate
intellectual property rules and management systems, and correcting some
obvious flaws in the way IPR has been implemented in developing countries.

On the issue of patents, it is in the interests of developing countries to
grant few domestic patents, while allowing their own inventors to file
patents in wealthier foreign markets. In practice, a number of developing
countries are excessively permissive in granting patents. The most obvious
consequence of this policy failure is in the area of cancer drugs, where
there is almost no access to new patented cancer drugs. Because people in
these countries actually have cancer, this lack of access has predictable
and unacceptable consequences, involving avoidable death and suffering.
WIPO can be part of the solution or part of the problem, and that goes also
to individual negotiators, who are now wasting considerable time at WIPO
without making much of a difference in terms of expanding access to new
cancer drugs.

KEI is disappointed in the performance of the Global Challenges group at
WIPO, and suggest the CDIP invite suggestions on how Global Challenges can
address the obvious and scandalous inequality in terms of access to cancer
drugs.

The work of the WIPO Chief Economist could be used to provide basic
economic analysis of the patent and copyright systems in developing
countries, including, for example, by evaluating the impact of restrictive
and permissive patent grants on access to medicine, and on development of
domestic pharmaceutical industries, with some numbers that make the debate
on these issues more grounded in evidence.

The WIPO Chief Economist could also provide some insight into the economies
of scale necessary to manufacturer low cost biologic drugs, and the policy
options for reducing entry barriers for biosimilar suppliers for biologic
drugs and vaccines



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