[Ip-health] KEI statement on GSK's announcement of policies to expand access to patented medicines.

George Carter fiar at verizon.net
Thu Mar 31 08:29:20 PDT 2016


Indeed, particularly when that rotten bone is a cover for lies where companies like GSK jack up prices in “developed” nations while low-income ones are “generously” upgraded to “middle-income.” It’s just sleazy maneuvering to try to rehabilitate a deservedly rotten reputation for fiscal rape, tax evasion through inversion and the ongoing practice of economic genocide by greed that is the hallmark of “privatized” R&D and perversions of intellectual property PRIVILEGES that pharma has been abusing in more and more horrendous ways over the decades.

We have a cure for hepatitis C at hand. We have had for a couple of YEARS now. In the U$A alone, nearly 20,000 people DIED for lack of a cure in 2013…
http://www.hivandhepatitis.com/hcv-epidemiology/5413-idweek-2015-hepatitis-c-mortality-continues-to-increase-in-the-us <http://www.hivandhepatitis.com/hcv-epidemiology/5413-idweek-2015-hepatitis-c-mortality-continues-to-increase-in-the-us> 

Funny how we don’t have national or international data on Hep C deaths since that time. Weirdly this paper’s abstract notes 350,000 deaths per year globally. Other reports say half a million. But then later in the paper:
MORTALITY

Chronic HCV infection causing about 2.4 million deaths each year. Recently reported that, the average annual age-adjusted mortality rate of deaths in which HCV was increased by 0.18 deaths per 100000 persons per year[14 <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4651911/#B14>].
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4651911/ <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4651911/>

Regardless…the numbers are NOT declining. When we have a CURE. Economic genocide is what it is rooted in nothing but greed as even the pharma-lobby-fied Grassley-Wyden Senate Finance Committee report underscores. 
George M. Carter

> On Mar 31, 2016, at 10:34 AM, Michael H Davis <m.davis at csuohio.edu> wrote:
> 
> I don't think so. It will be great news when medicines are not a private fiefdom where people are expected to say thank you for any favors. WHen governments do their job, and drugs become not just a right but a matter of public research, ownership, and distribution, then it will be great news. This is just more of the same bad news in a different package. I don't think we should be grateful when the richest industrial sector throws us a bone.
> 
> 




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