[Ip-health] KEI requests that federal government use compulsory licenses on Kaleo held patents for devices used to administer opioid overdose reversal drug

James Love james.love at keionline.org
Tue Apr 3 07:00:47 PDT 2018


Michael, I don't see anything suspicious about brothers being inventors.
 It's interesting, but not suspicious.  In their case, they have an
interesting story of what motivated them to invent injection devices.

https://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/02/business/auvi-q-challenges-epipen-with-a-new-shape-and-size.html

On Mon, Apr 2, 2018 at 5:16 PM, Michael H Davis <m.davis at csuohio.edu> wrote:

>
> Hmm...that they are brothers is suspicious don't you think? Sort of like
> generics... You'd never know that if you read the patents.
>
>
> _________________________________________
>
>
> Prof. Mickey Davis
> 216/687-2228(phone)
> 917/771-0235 (cell)
>
> Mailing Address:
> Cleveland State University
> 2121 Euclid Avenue, LB 234
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> Campus Location:
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> Admitted to practice before the United States Patent and Trademark Office,
> Reg. No. 45,863
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>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Kim Treanor <kim.treanor at keionline.org>
> Date: 4/2/18 07:15 (GMT-08:00)
> To: Ip-health <ip-health at lists.keionline.org>
> Subject: [Ip-health] KEI requests that federal government use compulsory
> licenses on Kaleo held patents for devices used to administer opioid
> overdose reversal drug
>
> https://www.keionline.org/27541
>
> KEI requests that federal government use compulsory licenses on Kaléo held
> patents for devices used to administer opioid overdose reversal drug
>
> KEI has submitted a request to Mr. James Carroll, Acting Director of the
> Office of National Drug Control Policy, and to Ms. Kellyanne Conway,
> Counselor to the President and appointed “opioid czar,” asking that the
> federal government use its authority under 28 U.S.C. § 1498(a), to
> authorize third parties to use patents held by kaléo Inc., in order to
> expand competition and lower prices for devices that are used to deliver
> naloxone to reverse an opioid overdose.
>
> In a case similar to the Epipen, the drug, in this case, naloxone, is
> available as a generic, but an important device used to deliver the
> treatment is protected by several patents. Specifically, the letter to
> Carroll and Conway addresses a device sold under the brand name of Evzio by
> the company now known as kaléo Inc.. Kaléo lists 25 patents for Evzio in
> the FDA Orange Book. All 25 patents list two Virginia based twin brothers,
> Eric and Evan Edwards, among the inventors.
>
> Evzio, the only auto-injector for naloxone, has increased in price over
> 500% since it was first entered on to the market, and a two pack now costs
> $4,500.[1}
>
> --
> Kim Treanor
> Knowledge Ecology International
> kim.treanor at keionline.org
> tel.: +1.202.332.2670 <(202)%20332-2670>
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-- 
James Love.  Knowledge Ecology International
http://www.keionline.org/donate.html
KEI DC tel: +1.202.332.2670, US Mobile: +1.202.361.3040, Geneva Mobile:
+41.76.413.6584, twitter.com/jamie_love


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