<div dir="ltr"><a href="https://www.regulations.gov/comment/NIST-2021-0001-18079">https://www.regulations.gov/comment/NIST-2021-0001-18079</a><br><br>The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA). <span class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif"> </span>As expected, PhRMA thinks that NIST has not been restrictive enough as regards march-in rights, and wants consideration of prices banned altogether. PhRMA wants licensees consulted in march-in proceedings, and more time to respond. PhRMA wants to narrow the definition of a subject invention when there is co-funding. (See submission by Abinader above on same topic, different view). PhRMA wants to relax sanctions for non-reporting of federal funding.<div><br></div><div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif"><a href="https://www.regulations.gov/comment/NIST-2021-0001-17950">https://www.regulations.gov/comment/NIST-2021-0001-17950</a></div></div><div><br></div><div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif">Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO). “The proposed rule should make clear that a march-in determination under 35 USC §203(a)(1) may be based only on conduct that is attributable to the contractor or assignee, whereas a determination under 35 USC §203(a)(2)-(3) may additionally be based on conduct that is attributable to the licensee.” BIO is asking that the obligation to bring an invention to “practical obligation” and make products “available to the public on reasonable terms” not apply to licensees.</div><br></div></div>